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Tiki Stardust

I am hosting a solo exhibition called Tiki Stardust, at the Tairawhiti Museum.  Here’s a blurb:

Tiki Stardust is the beginning of an adventure. Tiki is a Māori girl. She loves drawing, books, cats and sitting up late to watch 12 O Clock Rock.  This exhibition is a prequel, a heraldic vision of rock n roll glory, originally glimpsed through the television in the 1980’s.

Six illustrated panels tell the very beginning of Tiki and the invasion of the White Devil.  S/he is a glitter clad, gender ambiguous rock god/dess that explodes into Tiki’s life.  And changes everything.

These vector drawings are the product of an unfettered imagination and Adobe Illustrator. And a very good printer.

This exhibition is based on a very simple backstory of watching (far too much) late night television in the 80s. I used to watch a lot of rock gigs and um, I still do. I think the last one I watched was ‘It’s Alive’ The Ramones in 1977.

If you wanted to get serious for a minute (a very brief minute), then you could describe it as an exploration into bi-culturalism, colonialism and pop culture. All described in pop surrealist terms.

Wow, that was a lot of big words. Sorry about that, I’ll try not to do that again.

 

Tiki Stardust opens on Friday 9th October 2015 and closes Sunday 12 December 2015.

There are a limited number of catalogues for sale at the Museum.

 

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Goats

That got your attention. Please take a gander at this goat skull design.

The Story

Once upon a morning we went on a whanau walk through the whenua at Tawatapu, to hunt goats. I was armed with my camera!  Anyone who has driven around the Wharerata Ranges knows that there are a fuckton of goats in the forest up there. I love goats.  I could look at photos of them all day. This is probably why I never get much work done. Goats will be the new cats of the internet, mark my words!  And please don’t get me started on cats.

We saw a baby goat skull on the train tracks. It was sad – where was it’s Mum? Where was it’s whanau? What happened? These sorts of questions swirled in my head. Those sorts of questions are also one of the reasons I’d make a crap farmer. So I took a photo to remember the moment.

The Design

The photo forms the basis of this design.  The Aotearoa 666 logo is used as a brush to bring the goat skull out of the darkness. Don’t ask me how the extra face popped up the top there, it just did that. Stuff happens. As Lemmy would say.
This is one of my personal favourites; the photo comes straight out of Tawatapu, also known as Bartletts, where my grandparents lived.

This design featured in the Gnosis exhibition and yes, it’s also available as a t-shirt here.