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Tiki Stardust

I am hosting a solo exhibition called Tiki Stardust, at the Tairawhiti Museum.  Here’s a blurb:

Tiki Stardust is the beginning of an adventure. Tiki is a Māori girl. She loves drawing, books, cats and sitting up late to watch 12 O Clock Rock.  This exhibition is a prequel, a heraldic vision of rock n roll glory, originally glimpsed through the television in the 1980’s.

Six illustrated panels tell the very beginning of Tiki and the invasion of the White Devil.  S/he is a glitter clad, gender ambiguous rock god/dess that explodes into Tiki’s life.  And changes everything.

These vector drawings are the product of an unfettered imagination and Adobe Illustrator. And a very good printer.

This exhibition is based on a very simple backstory of watching (far too much) late night television in the 80s. I used to watch a lot of rock gigs and um, I still do. I think the last one I watched was ‘It’s Alive’ The Ramones in 1977.

If you wanted to get serious for a minute (a very brief minute), then you could describe it as an exploration into bi-culturalism, colonialism and pop culture. All described in pop surrealist terms.

Wow, that was a lot of big words. Sorry about that, I’ll try not to do that again.

 

Tiki Stardust opens on Friday 9th October 2015 and closes Sunday 12 December 2015.

There are a limited number of catalogues for sale at the Museum.

 

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Tiki Rerea!

Tena koutou katoa!

Since I last posted here I have been busy doing my thang. I’ve now gone to two Craft Markets in Gisborne and enjoyed both of them. I’m looking forward to August’s market.  Over the last year or so, I’ve started making hair clips again. I used to make clips over a decade ago, just because I felt like it. Well, now I feel like it again.  It’s mainly because I can’t find the sort of things I like to wear, so in a true DIY spirit, I make my own. I’ve developed a new found appreciation for tiki and have paired them with various other items that I would like to wear in my hair.

I made the skull flower the Deathpunkfest ghoul is wearing in a poster from last year by cutting up a bracelet and a lei and adding the elements together.  I often make things that influence what I draw, or I draw something and then I make it.  Either way, it’s all conducive to the creative process.  I thought I would put that in there for people who get confused about what I do. I do everything! Preparing end of year financials, planning, making the art, photography, marketing. Everything! Haha, all that and I’m a mother too.

These flying tiki, or tiki rerea came about by combining glittery butterflies, plastic tiki and hair clips. I like to take things from popular culture and put my own take on it.  It’s a very Māori take, but with a good dose of fuck you attitude too. Orite ki a Maui, hahahahaha!   I’m never sure if other people would like to wear them, but I’m pretty stoked when they do.

These are all the tiki, past and present, that I have made to date. None of them are the same as any other, they are all individual little snowflakes.  They are unique, and are made for ladies who like to feel unique too.
Hey – how do you catch a unique lady? UNIQUE UP ON HER! :D

The all black bow tiki is affectionately dubbed the Bela Lugosi tiki bow.  While I was making it, I kept humming ‘Bela Lugosi’s Dead‘ by Bauhaus.  You really can’t kill a vampire. They hang around forever.
Oh, and I included some clips I made from some specialty beaded fringing I’ve had for about as long too.

I have many other things on the go, namely three large vector projects. I’ll post them up when I am satisfied that they are finished.

Until then, if you would like to purchase a tiki, or see what else I have for sale, check my Facebook page.  Or leave a message below.  Be quick! People are baggsing them already. They are all NZ$20 plus shipping.

Mauri Ora ki a koutou! <3

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Kaiti Aki

Nga mihi nunui ki a koutou!

I have recently finished working on the t-shirt designs for the Ka Pai Kaiti Waitangi Day festival. This is a whānau day that has been regularly held for over ten years, in the suburb of Kaiti, which is a part of Turanganui-a-Kiwa. The place where I live and work.

I started donating my time and energy into the t-shirt printing in 2008.  What happens is that every year we come up with an idea/whakaaro to promote where we live. I come up with a design, it gets put on to a screen, then I print the shirts during the festival.  People can bring their own t-shirts along on the day and give a small koha (a one or two dollar coin) to help cover costs.  I got this idea from going to Punkfest in Wellington; nothing like a bit of DIY inspiration!

The whakaaro was to make shirts promoting Kaiti cheap and affordable for whanau (members of the community) who live in the area.  So everyone can wear a Kaiti shirt. Before the weekend we print about 30 shirts for the volunteers who work hard to make the day a success.

This year two shirts were designed. The Kaiti Aki shirt and the K.I.N.G.s shirt. There’s a bunch of photos on Flickr of people wearing them, and you can look at images over the last month of our little Kaiti Aki as it was created on Webstagram.

And of course there are the pictures I have uploaded here.

 

Mauri Ora!