Taku Kuia

Taku Kuia was held at a local pop-up gallery in central Gisborne.  Curated by Isobel Te Rauna,  the show featured female artists honouring their grandmothers. Here are photos of the two pieces I made – digital portraits of my wonderful nannies. Bonus pic of my father with the portrait of his Mum!

Tiki Stardust opens at the Tairāwhiti Museum

The Tiki Stardust exhibition opened at the Tairāwhiti Museum on Friday 15 October 2015.
The event was a lovely and lively gathering, my son Tawhairiri was the photographer.
He took photos of all of us in front of the art pieces.
A press clipping is also attached.

Tiki Stardust

I am hosting a solo exhibition called Tiki Stardust, at the Tairawhiti Museum.  Here’s a blurb:

Tiki Stardust is the beginning of an adventure. Tiki is a Māori girl. She loves drawing, books, cats and sitting up late to watch 12 O Clock Rock.  This exhibition is a prequel, a heraldic vision of rock n roll glory, originally glimpsed through the television in the 1980’s.

Six illustrated panels tell the very beginning of Tiki and the invasion of the White Devil.  S/he is a glitter clad, gender ambiguous rock god/dess that explodes into Tiki’s life.  And changes everything.

These vector drawings are the product of an unfettered imagination and Adobe Illustrator. And a very good printer.

This exhibition is based on a very simple backstory of watching (far too much) late night television in the 80s. I used to watch a lot of rock gigs and um, I still do. I think the last one I watched was ‘It’s Alive’ The Ramones in 1977.

If you wanted to get serious for a minute (a very brief minute), then you could describe it as an exploration into bi-culturalism, colonialism and pop culture. All described in pop surrealist terms.

Wow, that was a lot of big words. Sorry about that, I’ll try not to do that again.

 

Tiki Stardust opens on Friday 9th October 2015 and closes Sunday 12 December 2015.

There are a limited number of catalogues for sale at the Museum.

 

Papa Tawhai pop art portrait

This is a whanau illustration, of my maternal grandfather, Tawhairiri.  He was one of the last cowboys. A real legend, in his grand daughters’ eyes. The first picture is a portrait from 1993, at his last family Christmas with us. Papa Tawhai passed away in 1994. I named my son after him, Tawhairiri. Or Tawhai, for short. While I was growing up, he lived in a converted school house at Bartletts (about 30 km south of Gisborne). His father is buried in the family cemetery there.

This was an experiment in pop art portraiture. Hopefully more Johnny Romeo than Andy Warhol. The colours were inspired by the land and seascapes around Whareongaonga, Tawatapu (Bartletts), Wharerata and Muriwai, all south of Gisborne. For more information about the whenua and moana, please visit Te Iwi o Ngai Tamanuhiri on their website or facebook page.

A framed digital print featured in the tribal exhibition, Toi Tāmanuhiri,  at Te Muriwai Marae in 2013.  It’s shown in one of the photographs, alongside art pieces made by my older brother and sister.

NFS

 

 

 

Tekau

Tekau means Ten in Te Reo Māori.  There are ten brushes in this picture, one is black, with a bright slash of magenta and a blob of faux ink in the right hand corner.  This picture, and the brushes, illustrate my whakapapa (genealogy) on my father’s side.

So, what is this? It’s not a skull, or a pretty rocknroll girl. It’s a brush, this is my brush, this is how I want my brush, one of my favourite tools, to look.  My Māori brush – styled in the form of a taiaha. This is my ultimate weapon of choice.  This drawing was originally done in pen and ink, then developed in Adobe Illustrator.

It featured in the Toi Tāmanuhiri exhibitions in 2013.  There are 4 prints in total. All have sold except one. If you are interested in buying, please contact me.

Nga mihi

Gnosis

Gnosis was a group exhibition featuring work by Mary MacGregor-Reid, Math Kabryn, Melanie Tahata (that’s me!), Joel Bradley, Jared Holland, Abby Helasdottir and Steven Johnson Leyba.
It was held at at Nature: Art + Design, Newton, Auckland, from 18 October to 16 November, 2013.

Gnosis basically means to develop your own mode of deep critical thinking, maybe investing time in some esoteric or occult theories. Anyway, I was invited to be a part of this exhibition, by old friend and fellow Art School Girl of Doom, Mary MacGregor-Reid. I produced 3 large posters for the exhibition. They were all done in the style of the star skulls that I posted about here.  This post is packed with photos, so I’ll stop blithering and get on with it.

The Art

Pics of the prints at home,  hanging in the gallery in Auckland and a glimpse of my artists’ statement. A post about the Goat skull design is here.

The Venue

This is where the Nature gallery was, on St. Benedict’s Street in Newtown. Beautiful Auckland, days like that made me miss you.

The Opening

This is obviously the fun bit. Hanging out with friends, old and new, was really awesome.  Thank you to everyone who came along, Mary for being awesome and Jared at Nature for currating the show.

Know Thyself

Early next year some of my work will be in a group show.
It is called ‘Know Thyself’ and is an exhibition with 3 other women artists.

The show will be held at ‘The Winemakers Daughter’, a local cafe and winebar at 88 Grey Street right here in Gisborne.

We will be previewing the show on Friday 6 January 2012 at 6pm. Wine and nibbles are provided so please feel free to come along.

Ma te wa, have a very Merry Christmas and I will see you all in the New Year.

Nga mihi o te wa me te tau hou.

Mauri Ora!