Te ‘Au o Tagaloa

This collaborative project held it’s finale on Thursday 22 June 2017.

Following on from the successful Matariki series last year with Nafanua, Te ‘Au o Tagaloa closed a week of workshops. The week itself featured tatau, tapa making and Pacific fono.

The week was well supported by the local community, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Te Puni Kōkiri and Tairāwhiti Museum.

Included with this post are photos of our rangatahi and kaumatua performing. Once again my primary role was to produce visual imagery for the background.  But I also did the costumes, marketing, financial management and funding applications, because I’m awesome and can do everything. Lol!

This piece is a homage to Pele – Creator of New Lands:

Tiki Stardust opens at the Tairāwhiti Museum

The Tiki Stardust exhibition opened at the Tairāwhiti Museum on Friday 15 October 2015.
The event was a lovely and lively gathering, my son Tawhairiri was the photographer.
He took photos of all of us in front of the art pieces.
A press clipping is also attached.

Papa Tawhai pop art portrait

This is a whanau illustration, of my maternal grandfather, Tawhairiri.  He was one of the last cowboys. A real legend, in his grand daughters’ eyes. The first picture is a portrait from 1993, at his last family Christmas with us. Papa Tawhai passed away in 1994. I named my son after him, Tawhairiri. Or Tawhai, for short. While I was growing up, he lived in a converted school house at Bartletts (about 30 km south of Gisborne). His father is buried in the family cemetery there.

This was an experiment in pop art portraiture. Hopefully more Johnny Romeo than Andy Warhol. The colours were inspired by the land and seascapes around Whareongaonga, Tawatapu (Bartletts), Wharerata and Muriwai, all south of Gisborne. For more information about the whenua and moana, please visit Te Iwi o Ngai Tamanuhiri on their website or facebook page.

A framed digital print featured in the tribal exhibition, Toi Tāmanuhiri,  at Te Muriwai Marae in 2013.  It’s shown in one of the photographs, alongside art pieces made by my older brother and sister.

NFS

 

 

 

Kaiti Aki

Nga mihi nunui ki a koutou!

I have recently finished working on the t-shirt designs for the Ka Pai Kaiti Waitangi Day festival. This is a whānau day that has been regularly held for over ten years, in the suburb of Kaiti, which is a part of Turanganui-a-Kiwa. The place where I live and work.

I started donating my time and energy into the t-shirt printing in 2008.  What happens is that every year we come up with an idea/whakaaro to promote where we live. I come up with a design, it gets put on to a screen, then I print the shirts during the festival.  People can bring their own t-shirts along on the day and give a small koha (a one or two dollar coin) to help cover costs.  I got this idea from going to Punkfest in Wellington; nothing like a bit of DIY inspiration!

The whakaaro was to make shirts promoting Kaiti cheap and affordable for whanau (members of the community) who live in the area.  So everyone can wear a Kaiti shirt. Before the weekend we print about 30 shirts for the volunteers who work hard to make the day a success.

This year two shirts were designed. The Kaiti Aki shirt and the K.I.N.G.s shirt. There’s a bunch of photos on Flickr of people wearing them, and you can look at images over the last month of our little Kaiti Aki as it was created on Webstagram.

And of course there are the pictures I have uploaded here.

 

Mauri Ora!