Gizzy’s Little Craft Market

Kia ora!
This Saturday I will be hosting a stall at Gizzy’s Little Craft Market.

That’s Saturday 30th June 2012, 9.30am – 4pm

At the Gisborne Army Hall.

It’s tomorrow! Eeeek!

I’ve got a small selection of things to sell, ranging from paintings, prints, and postcards.  There are even some crafty little items I made.

 

Here’s some photos! Cos we all like looking at photos 🙂

 

 

There’s more stuff posted on my facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/Aotearoa666

 

May the 4th

This is a poster for a gig in Palmerston North. It’s tomorrow!

It also happens to be on May the 4th – Intergalactic Star Wars Day.
So I made a homage to Star Wars, while referencing an old Turbojugend Aotearoa U-666 photo.

Go to the gig!  The best band in the galaxy are playing!

If you would like a print of this poster, you can purchase one (in all shapes and sizes) from Society 6.
The Deathpunkfest 2011 one is up there too.


The Book Project

Earlier this year, I visited my two wonderful friends, Mon and Ben, in Palmerston North. While I was there, Mon had a little book and asked me to fill it up with drawings during my stay.  And I did!

I decided to continue with this wonderful idea, and upon returning home I resolved to make this Book Project.  It appealed to the bibliophile in me. This time, I chose a theme and painted a page a day, then photographed it using Instagram.  This enabled me to share it on my Tumblr and Facebook feeds.  Well, that was in mid-January and I finished the book a few weeks ago.  I have just finished putting together a slideshow of all the images I have painted.

The book is all based on karakia, which can mean prayer, incantation or spell, in Te Reo Maori.  While I was studying at the University of Waikato I came across many different types of karakia, and have applied that here. It’s good for me to keep up my reo, a little bit a day helps!

Karakia are meant to help you feel at one with the atua (gods) who are really personifications of the natural forces/elements in the world. It’s about acknowledging the other things in the world about you.  They are good resources of poetry and prose in Te Reo Māori as well.

There are many different karakia inside. Some are to Tane, some are to greet the day, a prayer for children, an incantation for strength, and one for Tangaroa as we bade farewell to summer. Then there is the finishing karakia, right at the very end.  Here are some of my favourite images:

This book project also combined my native language with art, one of my other favourite things.  If you are a creative soul, and you know how difficult staring at a blank page can be, I totally recommend a daily art exercise like this.  Painting or drawing a little each day really helps to warm up and get you started on your other projects.  And it’s a good way to learn some karakia too!

I am planning on creating another book, and that will probably begin sometime next month.

Mauri Ora!

Competition Time!

Kia ora mai ra!

It’s that time of the year, when I celebrate another year of financial trading. Another year of getting older! And loving it.

Last year I ran a poster competition and two lucky winners each won a signed print. This year, the stakes are higher and I am giving away a hoody or t-shirt from the Print Mighty store. I’ve added 3 new designs; a full colour Kaiti Aki; a skull print design using the star logo; and Rangi the Raptor. Click on the following thumbnails for a good look at these designs:

Now, all you have to do is get your mates to like the Aotearoa 666 page on Facebook, and then post on the wall, saying they were sent by you.  The person who has generated the most likes, wins a garment of their choice!

Make sure they post on the wall, or I won’t know who sent them.

This competition is WORLDWIDE, and not just to those living in Aotearoa (New Zealand).
Because that’s how we ship!

I will announce the winner on May the 23rd.

Mauri Ora 🙂

Kaiti Aki

Nga mihi nunui ki a koutou!

I have recently finished working on the t-shirt designs for the Ka Pai Kaiti Waitangi Day festival. This is a whānau day that has been regularly held for over ten years, in the suburb of Kaiti, which is a part of Turanganui-a-Kiwa. The place where I live and work.

I started donating my time and energy into the t-shirt printing in 2008.  What happens is that every year we come up with an idea/whakaaro to promote where we live. I come up with a design, it gets put on to a screen, then I print the shirts during the festival.  People can bring their own t-shirts along on the day and give a small koha (a one or two dollar coin) to help cover costs.  I got this idea from going to Punkfest in Wellington; nothing like a bit of DIY inspiration!

The whakaaro was to make shirts promoting Kaiti cheap and affordable for whanau (members of the community) who live in the area.  So everyone can wear a Kaiti shirt. Before the weekend we print about 30 shirts for the volunteers who work hard to make the day a success.

This year two shirts were designed. The Kaiti Aki shirt and the K.I.N.G.s shirt. There’s a bunch of photos on Flickr of people wearing them, and you can look at images over the last month of our little Kaiti Aki as it was created on Webstagram.

And of course there are the pictures I have uploaded here.

 

Mauri Ora!

 

 

 

 

Turbo Maori

This is a painting I did a little while ago (last year in fact) and it’s taken me this long to put it online.  It’s already the face of the Turbojugend Aotearoa U-666 Facebook page (oooosh lookit me squeezing those links in!) so this little breather has been on the nets for a while.  But you all want a closer look at it – and even better – a chance to buy it don’t you?!?!

This picture was inspired by my love of all things Turbojugend and my Māori heritage.  This makes it Turbo Māori! I’ve based the koruru (face) on Ngāti Porou carving forms that I’ve looked at over the last couple of years.  If you study them you see their likeness to the people; the large foreheads, piercing stare and sharp, sometimes forked, tongue.  Tāngata like those deserve to wear a peak cap, haha.

The picture uses 3 colours; a warm blood red ground with thick black linework and white highlights.  Red, black and white, the ‘traditional’ Māori colours and also those used on the Tino Rangatiratanga flag.  Layered on top of an old placemat, varnished with polyurethane and mounted on a wooden block with a painting hook. 29cm x 21cm x 5cm (roughly 8 x 10″)

If you’re interested in buying this creation, contact me at mel@aotearoa666.com.

 

Wooden Heart

Treat me nice, treat me good, treat me like you really should…
So sang Elvis in Wooden Heart.  I thought of that song while I was painting this, but the whakataukī I used has an entirely different meaning!

Last year, in my teaching work we were using small A5 sized pieces of ply and drawing on them in pencil.  I took this idea a little further when I came home and sketched a picture of a heart (I have a medical model of one at home, a gift from a friend many years ago).  I added the ribbon and whakataukī He kokonga ngākau e kore e kitea.  This is the last part of the Māori proverb that runs –

He kohonga whare e kitea, he kokonga ngākau e kore e kitea
The corner of a house can be seen, but not a corner of a heart.

Basically I understood this to mean that you can never know someone’s intentions, or what’s truly going on in their heart, or what their motivations are.

Acrylic paint on plywood, private collection.