Papa Tawhai pop art portrait

This is a whanau illustration, of my maternal grandfather, Tawhairiri.  He was one of the last cowboys. A real legend, in his grand daughters’ eyes. The first picture is a portrait from 1993, at his last family Christmas with us. Papa Tawhai passed away in 1994. I named my son after him, Tawhairiri. Or Tawhai, for short. While I was growing up, he lived in a converted school house at Bartletts (about 30 km south of Gisborne). His father is buried in the family cemetery there.

This was an experiment in pop art portraiture. Hopefully more Johnny Romeo than Andy Warhol. The colours were inspired by the land and seascapes around Whareongaonga, Tawatapu (Bartletts), Wharerata and Muriwai, all south of Gisborne. For more information about the whenua and moana, please visit Te Iwi o Ngai Tamanuhiri on their website or facebook page.

A framed digital print featured in the tribal exhibition, Toi Tāmanuhiri,  at Te Muriwai Marae in 2013.  It’s shown in one of the photographs, alongside art pieces made by my older brother and sister.

NFS

 

 

 

Tekau

Tekau means Ten in Te Reo Māori.  There are ten brushes in this picture, one is black, with a bright slash of magenta and a blob of faux ink in the right hand corner.  This picture, and the brushes, illustrate my whakapapa (genealogy) on my father’s side.

So, what is this? It’s not a skull, or a pretty rocknroll girl. It’s a brush, this is my brush, this is how I want my brush, one of my favourite tools, to look.  My Māori brush – styled in the form of a taiaha. This is my ultimate weapon of choice.  This drawing was originally done in pen and ink, then developed in Adobe Illustrator.

It featured in the Toi Tāmanuhiri exhibitions in 2013.  There are 4 prints in total. All have sold except one. If you are interested in buying, please contact me.

Nga mihi