Skull Flower

“Why don’t you paint some nice flowers” I thought to myself one day, “that’s something nice” So I set about painting a nice flower.  Oh! let’s make it blaack! I added.  And a nice skull in it. Yeah, I like them types of flowers!

I pondered this greatly as I worked on this small canvas. It is a blue black flower (he pua) with a skull (he tohu o te tangata) in the centre, blossoming upon a vivid blood red background.  As I daubed away at the skull in the centre I asked myself “Geez – why do I like skulls so much?”

Is it all the doom and gloom? A symbol of death?  A morbid fascination with the darker side of life?

 

 

 

Yeah fuck yeah!

 

Ha ha – you thought I was going to say no, didn’t you?

Well, over the last six years I’ve lost a few friends and family, for various reasons.  I am not afraid to die, but I am afraid of what will happen to my son if I should shuffle off this mortal coil before he becomes an adult.

And ever since this started happening, I started drawing skulls.  Lots of them.  Skulls are the ultimate symbol of humanity.  A skull could represent anyone.  It could be me, it could be my son. It could be one of my whānau who have passed on.  It could be you! :O! Nothing represents my essential love for humanity like a good skull.

You can check out photos of the painting in the making on my tumblr or facebook page.  (And while you’re down there, chuck us a like or a follow please? Ta!)

This painting is 8 inches by 8 inches, painted using Golden acrylics and a nice medium as a finishing varnish.  This painting is also for sale! as it is small enough to ship.  I have paypal and can also accept bank transfers.  If you are interested in purchasing this painting, contact me at mel@aotearoa666.com.

This is my first post in Spring! Spring has sprung (at least here in Kaiti, Gisborne) and a merry sneezing season to you all.  I have included some photos of the plum tree blossoms, just in case some of you wanted an actual really nice flower.  Hehe.

He Hono Tangata

You may or may not remember this painting from the previous post about Skulls.

Well, back then this painting was a work in progress. Now it has been finished and sent to it’s new home in Auckland.

The rerenga on the red ribbon reads – He Hono Tangata E Kore E Motu

and is taken from the whakataukī that says:

He hono tangata e kore e motu; ka pā he taura waka e motu.

Nā, ko te tikanga o taua, kāore e taea e ngā hononga te tāngata e whati.  Engari ki ō rātou whakaaro.  Ko tēnei whakataukī e whakamahi ana ki ngā kōrero e pā ana ki tētahi mārena.  Ki a au nei, ko te mea nui e pā ana ki tēnei taonga, ko te kōrero, ko te tikanga rānei.  Tērā pea, ko te tūmanako rawe hoki.  Ae, ko taua te mea nui e mauria ana e tēnei taonga.

The reo pākehā translation of this proverb is

A human bond cannot be severed, unlike a canoe rope, it cannot be severed.

This speaks about the permanency of marriage and betrothal, the closest western proverb I can think of is ‘the ties that bind’.

These loveskull paintings are absolute joys to paint.  Despite my tough, rough n guts exterior (lol) I’m a big softy and love love love! to hear that my friends are shacking up and settling down…  Life. I fucking love it.

So the idea and hopes and wishes behind this painting is to wish my two friends all the best for their marriage and a very long, loving and prosperous life. Two skulls pressed together to form a heart, all wrapped in a big red bow.  Ta daa!!

Mauri Ora ki a kōrua!

Wooden Heart

Treat me nice, treat me good, treat me like you really should…
So sang Elvis in Wooden Heart.  I thought of that song while I was painting this, but the whakataukī I used has an entirely different meaning!

Last year, in my teaching work we were using small A5 sized pieces of ply and drawing on them in pencil.  I took this idea a little further when I came home and sketched a picture of a heart (I have a medical model of one at home, a gift from a friend many years ago).  I added the ribbon and whakataukī He kokonga ngākau e kore e kitea.  This is the last part of the Māori proverb that runs –

He kohonga whare e kitea, he kokonga ngākau e kore e kitea
The corner of a house can be seen, but not a corner of a heart.

Basically I understood this to mean that you can never know someone’s intentions, or what’s truly going on in their heart, or what their motivations are.

Acrylic paint on plywood, private collection.

I LIKE TO ROCK

So earlier this year I spied a hand painted rock over at Jo Tito’s site.  I thought it was really mesmerising and the colours were really choice too.  So I asked Jo how much they were and she suggested we trade art.

I like trading art.  Trading is good.

And finally, yes, FINALLY I finished a little something to trade in return.

So, because this site is all about (fist) pumping out the pictures, here’s some of the piece I made and Jo’s Perfect Rock.

They were taken with my phone, using my favourite gadget.  The first one gives a reasonable shot of the shed and all the other things I got going on.

The small collage I made was done using an old frame, clothes dye and varnish.  The collage itself was constructed from some red envelopes I picked up at Wah Lees while in Auckland last.  And the background is filled with Aotearoa 666 stamps and a phrase in te reo Māori.

The last one shows my rock in my hot little hands. I love her! She’s sitting in an eastern pointing window sill, she can catch plenty of sun there in the mornings.

 

Rockin’! 😀