Te ‘Au o Tagaloa

This collaborative project held it’s finale on Thursday 22 June 2017.

Following on from the successful Matariki series last year with Nafanua, Te ‘Au o Tagaloa closed a week of workshops. The week itself featured tatau, tapa making and Pacific fono.

The week was well supported by the local community, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Te Puni Kōkiri and Tairāwhiti Museum.

Included with this post are photos of our rangatahi and kaumatua performing. Once again my primary role was to produce visual imagery for the background.  But I also did the costumes, marketing, financial management and funding applications, because I’m awesome and can do everything. Lol!

This piece is a homage to Pele – Creator of New Lands:

Taku Kuia

Taku Kuia was held at a local pop-up gallery in central Gisborne.  Curated by Isobel Te Rauna,  the show featured female artists honouring their grandmothers. Here are photos of the two pieces I made – digital portraits of my wonderful nannies. Bonus pic of my father with the portrait of his Mum!

Nafanua

This was a family event that took place during a Matariki series of workshops.

The story of Nafanua – Samoa’s Bat Goddess – was told through dance.

This was a collaborative project with Malia Patea-Taylor, Isobel Te Rauna and Tautua Arts.

My primary role was to produce several digital images for projection while our kids danced. I also worked on the costumes, marketing and general get-it-done person.

Behold the Bat Signal!

 

 

Goats

That got your attention. Please take a gander at this goat skull design.

The Story

Once upon a morning we went on a whanau walk through the whenua at Tawatapu, to hunt goats. I was armed with my camera!  Anyone who has driven around the Wharerata Ranges knows that there are a fuckton of goats in the forest up there. I love goats.  I could look at photos of them all day. This is probably why I never get much work done. Goats will be the new cats of the internet, mark my words!  And please don’t get me started on cats.

We saw a baby goat skull on the train tracks. It was sad – where was it’s Mum? Where was it’s whanau? What happened? These sorts of questions swirled in my head. Those sorts of questions are also one of the reasons I’d make a crap farmer. So I took a photo to remember the moment.

The Design

The photo forms the basis of this design.  The Aotearoa 666 logo is used as a brush to bring the goat skull out of the darkness. Don’t ask me how the extra face popped up the top there, it just did that. Stuff happens. As Lemmy would say.
This is one of my personal favourites; the photo comes straight out of Tawatapu, also known as Bartletts, where my grandparents lived.

This design featured in the Gnosis exhibition and yes, it’s also available as a t-shirt here.