Witchypoopoo

On sleepless nights,  I tell my boy stories about our cats. Stories are a great way to distract sick children and they work better than movies.  Hoomins often project personalities on to their pets, and their habits on to ourselves.

In some stories, Chewbarky is a vampire – the great Count Chewbarkula! He was a courageous Crusader hero that fought against the infidel but sadly, lost his way.  Now he wants to drain the life force from any can of jellymeat he can sink his fangs into.

Freddystein aka Freddy, had a second chance at life when he was reanimated by a discarded cheezburger…it was electric…! Now he hunts his way through the frozen voids looking for the perfect fries (see what I did there).

Mz. Peyonce glides through the night skies on her broomstick, hailing the dark forces in her true, diabolical Witchypoopoo form. Don’t leave your Type O Negative dvds lying around! She’ll sacrifice them!!

We still can’t decide which famous monster Fatty Catty should be… Elvis or Wolfman…?  Only time will tell…

You can view colour vector versions of these fabulous monsters at the Aotearoa 666 Red Bubble store .

 

Tautua Arts

In 2017, I started a new business venture. It’s called Tautua Arts and I work alongside Malia Patea-Taylor. We have been working together on Matariki projects for the last few years (see here and here). Malia put in an abstract for the Pacific Arts Association conference about this mahi, and it was accepted.

So, Tautua Arts travelled to Samoa to deliver a presentation where Malia gave a korero and siva. Malia also recorded a song, produced by Taina Keelan, and I created a backing film.

We travelled with the tumuaki of Tairawhiti REAP, Ani Pahuru-Huriwai.  She supported us during our presentation at the National University of Samoa. Tautua Arts work collaboratively with Tairawhiti REAP to deliver ACE programmes in Te Reo Hāmoa or A’oga Tagaloa.  Together we have developed a professional development programme, Te Wā o Le Vā: Reclaiming our space together. This is designed for Māori and Pacific practitioners in all sectors (health, education, justice etc) who work with Māori and Pacific in the community.

Here are some stills from the film.

Malo soifua!

 

 

Te ‘Au o Tagaloa

This collaborative project held it’s finale on Thursday 22 June 2017.

Following on from the successful Matariki series last year with Nafanua, Te ‘Au o Tagaloa closed a week of workshops. The week itself featured tatau, tapa making and Pacific fono.

The week was well supported by the local community, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Te Puni Kōkiri and Tairāwhiti Museum.

Included with this post are photos of our rangatahi and kaumatua performing. Once again my primary role was to produce visual imagery for the background.  But I also did the costumes, marketing, financial management and funding applications, because I’m awesome and can do everything. Lol!

This piece is a homage to Pele – Creator of New Lands:

Taku Kuia

Taku Kuia was held at a local pop-up gallery in central Gisborne.  Curated by Isobel Te Rauna,  the show featured female artists honouring their grandmothers. Here are photos of the two pieces I made – digital portraits of my wonderful nannies. Bonus pic of my father with the portrait of his Mum!

Nafanua

This was a family event that took place during a Matariki series of workshops.

The story of Nafanua – Samoa’s Bat Goddess – was told through dance.

This was a collaborative project with Malia Patea-Taylor, Isobel Te Rauna and Tautua Arts.

My primary role was to produce several digital images for projection while our kids danced. I also worked on the costumes, marketing and general get-it-done person.

Behold the Bat Signal!

 

 

Tiki Stardust opens at the Tairāwhiti Museum

The Tiki Stardust exhibition opened at the Tairāwhiti Museum on Friday 15 October 2015.
The event was a lovely and lively gathering, my son Tawhairiri was the photographer.
He took photos of all of us in front of the art pieces.
A press clipping is also attached.

Tiki Stardust

I am hosting a solo exhibition called Tiki Stardust, at the Tairawhiti Museum.  Here’s a blurb:

Tiki Stardust is the beginning of an adventure. Tiki is a Māori girl. She loves drawing, books, cats and sitting up late to watch 12 O Clock Rock.  This exhibition is a prequel, a heraldic vision of rock n roll glory, originally glimpsed through the television in the 1980’s.

Six illustrated panels tell the very beginning of Tiki and the invasion of the White Devil.  S/he is a glitter clad, gender ambiguous rock god/dess that explodes into Tiki’s life.  And changes everything.

These vector drawings are the product of an unfettered imagination and Adobe Illustrator. And a very good printer.

This exhibition is based on a very simple backstory of watching (far too much) late night television in the 80s. I used to watch a lot of rock gigs and um, I still do. I think the last one I watched was ‘It’s Alive’ The Ramones in 1977.

If you wanted to get serious for a minute (a very brief minute), then you could describe it as an exploration into bi-culturalism, colonialism and pop culture. All described in pop surrealist terms.

Wow, that was a lot of big words. Sorry about that, I’ll try not to do that again.

 

Tiki Stardust opens on Friday 9th October 2015 and closes Sunday 12 December 2015.

There are a limited number of catalogues for sale at the Museum.